Category Archives: Hormesis

Interphone study reports on mobile phone use and brain cancer risk

(May 17, 2010) The Interphone Study Group today published their results in the International Journal of Epidemiology (direct media link). The paper presents the results of analyses of brain tumour (glioma and meningioma) risk in relation to mobile phone use in all Interphone study centres combined. Continue reading

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Brain tumour risk in relation to mobile telephone use: results of the INTERPHONE international case–control study

(May 17, 2010) The rapid increase in mobile telephone use has generated concern about possible health risks related to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from this technology. Continue reading

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Interphone study reports on mobile phone use and brain cancer risk

(May 17, 2010) The Interphone Study Group today published their results in the International Journal of Epidemiology (direct media link). The paper presents the results of analyses of brain tumour (glioma and meningioma) risk in relation to mobile phone use in all Interphone study centres combined. Continue reading

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Fowl surprise! Methylmercury improves hatching rate

(Mar. 5, 2010) A pinch of methylmercury is just ducky for mallard reproduction, according to a new federal study. The findings are counterintuitive, since methylmercury is ordinarily a potent neurotoxic pollutant. Over a two-month feeding trial, treated adults produced more offspring — and young that at least initially grew faster — than did mallards dining mercuryfree. Continue reading

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Fowl surprise! Methylmercury improves hatching rate

(March 5, 2010) A pinch of methylmercury is just ducky for mallard reproduction, according to a new federal study. The findings are counterintuitive, since methylmercury is ordinarily a potent neurotoxic pollutant. Continue reading

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Egyptian eyeliner may have warded off disease

(Jan. 8, 2010) Clearly, ancient Egyptians didn’t get the memo about lead poisoning. Their eye makeup was full of the stuff. Although today we know that lead can cause brain damage and miscarriages, the Egyptians believed that lead-based cosmetics protected against eye diseases. Now, new research suggests that they may have been on to something. Continue reading

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Principles and practice of hormetic treatment of aging and age-related diseases

(June 3, 2008) Aging is characterized by stochastic accumulation of molecular damage, progressive failure of maintenance and repair, and consequent onset of age-related diseases. Applying hormesis in aging research and therapy is based on the principle of stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways by repeated exposure to mild stress. Continue reading

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Principles and practice of hormetic treatment of aging and age-related diseases

(Jun. 3, 2008) Aging is characterized by stochastic accumulation of molecular damage, progressive failure of maintenance and repair, and consequent onset of age-related diseases. Applying hormesis in aging research and therapy is based on the principle of stimulation of maintenance and repair pathways by repeated exposure to mild stress. Continue reading

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Radiation, ecology and the invalid LNT Model: The evolutionary imperative

(Sep. 27, 2006) Metabolic and energetic efficiency, and hence fitness of organisms to survive, should be maximal in their habitats. This tenet of evolutionary biology invalidates the linear-nothreshold (LNT) model for the risk consequences of environmental agents. Continue reading

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Radiation, Ecology and the Invalid LNT Model: The Evolutionary Imperative

(September 27, 2006) Metabolic and energetic efficiency, and hence fitness of organisms to survive, should be maximal in their habitats. This tenent of evolutionary biology invalidates the linear-nothreshold (LNT) model for the risk consequences of environmental agents. Continue reading

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